1. What to do:
  • Small but frequent amounts of an oral electrolyte solution every 15 to 20 minutes with a spoon or an oral syringe.
  • Gradually increase the amount of solution you’re giving if your child is able to keep it down for more than a couple of hours without vomiting
  • Slowly reintroduce formula (for infants), or bland food (for toddlers or older) bananas, applesauce, cereals, soups, toast, rice. Avoid milk product in children>1y/o with 24 hours of vomiting.
  • Call your pediatrician if you notice signs of dehydration

2. Signs of Dehydration

Mild Dehydration
  • Dry mouth
  • Few or no tears when crying
  • Fussy behavior in infants
  • Fewer than four wet diapers per day in an infant (more than 4-6 hours without a wet diaper in a younger infant under 6 months of age)
  • No urination for 6-8 hours in children
  • Soft spot in infants head that looks flatter than usual or somewhat sunken
Severe Dehydration
  • Very dry mouth (looks “sticky” inside)
  • Dry, wrinkled, or doughy skin
  • Inactivity or decreased alertness
  • Appears weak or limp
  • Sunken eyes
  • Sunken soft spot in an infant
  • Excessive sleepiness or disorientation
  • Deep, rapid breathing
  • No urination for more than 6 to 8 hours in infants
  • No urination for more than 8-10 hours in children
  • Fast or weakened pulse

3. Bring child to the office if:
  • Child under 1 month old and vomiting all feeds
  • Projectile or forceful vomiting in an infant (<3 m/o)
  • Vomiting starts after a head injury
  • Vomiting (without diarrhea) is accompanied by fever
  • Vomiting of bright green or yellow- green fluid
  • Your child’s belly feels hard, bloated, and painful between vomiting episodes
  • Vomiting is accompanied by severe stomach pain
  • Vomit resembles coffee grounds (blood that mixes with stomach acid will be brownish in color and looks like coffee grounds)
  • Vomiting blood